A change of perspective in politics

  Ever since I discovered the simplicity of the libertarian non-aggression principle, I've been forced to reconsider everything political in terms of the principle.   However, getting other people to see things from my perspective, however simple it seems to me, has been a difficult task. I can't pretend that things are really the way they seemed to be before discovering libertarianism, and I don't know if I should be more angry at the politicians and power-mongers who continue to foster the illusions for their own purposes and goals, or the large majority of mainstream people who buy into the illusions, or at least, pretend to go along with the illusions.

Part of the reason that governments have so much power over ordinary people is the perceived legitimacy they possess, given to them by ordinary people.  This legitimacy will last as long as most people continue to believe that governments have some valid, moral authority to initiate force and fraud against people, and no longer than that.

Without that perceived legitimacy, governments and their agents would be recognized as the criminals that they really are. At best, they're terrorists who believe in some just or unjust cause.  At worst, they're just thieves, murderers, con men, and mobsters on a larger scale than most thieves, murderers, con men, and mobsters.

What?  You don't think this?  You think government is a force for good?  Well, consider this:

Who banned DDT so that we have to deal with the return of blood-sucking bedbugs?
Who removed phosphates from laundry detergent, making it harder to keep clothes clean?
Who forced television broadcasters to stop using analog transmissions and send digital broadcast signals instead, forcing consumers to get a digital converter or a newer, digital television?
Who forced manufacturers to stop making high-flow showerheads and high-capacity flush toilets, creating less satisfaction and more plumbing problems for consumers? 
Who tried to ban incandescent light bulbs and force everyone to convert to compact flourescent light bulbs, and thus reduce lighting quality and increase the risk of mercury poisoning?
Who restricted the producers of the flu vaccine (which has to be created anew every year to keep up with the continual modification of the flu virus), and thus created shortages of the vaccine and increased the chances of people dying from the flu?

Not enough for you?  There's plenty more:

Who creates almost all monopolies, especially the monopolies for your utility services: water/sewage, electricity, natural gas, garbage services, and cable television services?
Who controls the money supply, and ensures that we have a continual monetary inflation every year?
Who goes to war, with all the ensuing death and destruction that wars cause?

Or consider these simple facts:

Who makes you pay to drive a vehicle (driver's license)
Who makes you pay to go to work and earn a living (income taxes)?
Who makes you pay to buy goods and services (sales taxes)?
Who makes you pay to own land and property (property taxes)?
Who decides how you are allowed to use your property?

The answer to the above questions, and many other, similar questions should be obvious, and if that isn't enough to make you mad and wonder why so many people put up with it, then I'm not sure that I understand you or how you think.

The evils of government are simple and obvious, no conspiracy thinking is necessary, and it is high time that ordinary people stopped granting legitimacy to the government. We should stop pretending that governments are basically good, and started recognizing that governments create more problems than they solve.  Government isn't even a "necessary evil", just an evil.

Once this happens, then the human race will be ready to progress to the next major step in our evolution and destiny. Or, to put it in a less grandiose way, more people will have more choices and opportunities for controlling their own lives and happiness.

Amazing Grace Syndrome

I enjoy listening to music, and, as an amateur musician, playing and writing music.  In my lifetime, there's no telling how many songs I've listened to, or how many times I've listened to them.  It can sometimes be difficult for a songwriter to write a song that doesn't sound too much like another, already existing song.  But there's another problem, even for the casual listener, in just remembering how a song or tune goes, even if you're just thinking about it or humming it. 

A really distinctive tune or melody can be so powerful that it obliterates any other tune or melody that you're trying to play or remember.  Amazing Grace is one such song.  It has such a strong, simple melody that anything that sounds anything like it can just be obliterated out of your mind and taken over by its melody, instead.  You can start humming the melody of another song, and it quickly turns into Amazing Grace.  And then you can't get Amazing Grace out of your head.

I call this Amazing Grace Syndrome.  Heh.